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Customised training

Customised training

We deliver customised training solutions to meet the needs of workplaces and employees, and can tailor programs across a broad range of topics to cater for your personalised needs.

We are a specialised training provider, offering research and evidence-led training services across family dispute resolution, mediation, relationship counselling, family violence and primary prevention.

We have considerable practice and expertise delivering programs for individuals, families and communities affected by mental health difficulties, trauma, grief/loss and family violence and we also deliver a range of preventative and early intervention programs. We provide expertise in training across family dispute resolution and mediation.

Our Training and Development team resources with a focus on embedding our articulated team vision into everyday practice which is:

  • industry leading and nationally recognised
  • visionary in design and delivery
  • experienced and qualified trainers
  • research and evidence-led
  • high quality.

Our customised training solutions provide:

  • a personalised one-on-one consultancy service with our experienced education consultants, including an initial consultation to ensure we understand your needs
  • a tailored, needs-based approach to design and delivery of programs
  • research and evidence-led programs which incorporate leading clinical practice
  • onsite training, as well as online, webinar and blended delivery options.

We can provide training across a range of topics including, but not limited, to those listed below.

Learn the definition of family violence and how to ascertain which behaviours are family violence and which are not.

The Family Law Act 1975 will be examined with opportunities for participants to consider statistics and population groups that are more likely to experience family violence.

Other key concepts include; perspectives of family and domestic violence, individual pathology and inter-generational perspectives of violence, social stressors and individual risk and effects of common beliefs on the person experiencing the violence.

 

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the dynamics in relationships and their interactions 
  • Family violence and abuse is not a “relationship problem” 
  • How family violence manifests in these interactions
  • The presence of coercive control in a relationship 
  • Understand adult attachment styles in the context of family violence behaviours
  • Inadvertent collusion in sessions
  • Role-plays focused on assessing these styles/questioning and working with the family violence dance in adult relationships
  • Skills in raising the violence with the users of violence, and the recipients of violence.
  • Looking at subtly coercive behaviours, and management of self and others
  • How family violence in separated families occurs in different ways
  • How family violence occurs differently in specific communities such as culturally and linguistically diverse or immigrant communiities and in church and denomination areas

Ideal for:

This workshop is particularly suited to attendees who already have an understanding of family violence and/or work with family violence as part of their profession and wish to extend and deepen their knowledge in this area.

Learn about the impact of family violence on the family dispute resolution (FDR) process.

This will cover the identification of family violence, skills in how to ask the difficult questions and what this means for the client’s capacity to negotiate. It will also address how to tailor the negotiation process to maximise suitability and how to manage the clients’ participation in the process. Some dilemmas that involve impartiality and neutrality, whilst maintaining the best interests of children in parenting matters will be discussed.

Family violence can be a difficult subject to discuss with clients in any service. Within a dispute resolution context, it is particularly important to ask questions to identify family violence. Family violence changes the power balance of the negotiation process and impacts upon clients’ capacity and suitability to undertake the FDR process.

Learning outcomes

Participants will gain increased skills in:

  • asking questions in a sensitive manner
  • asking questions in a neutral and impartial manner
  • setting up dispute resolution processes to ensure safety and capacity
  • preparing clients for managing the FDR process when they have experienced family violence
  • gaining a deeper understanding of the impact of family violence in FDR process and appropriate strategies where parents continue to interact with each other as part of their arrangements
  • knowing when and how to refer on appropriately.

Ideal for:

FDR Practitioners, mediators, lawyers and people working with separated families.

Gain increased skills and knowledge in identifying and assessing for suicide risk.

Professionals who provide services for individuals or families often need to assess for risk of suicide in their clients or group participants.

For a number of services, assessing for suicide risk is a requirement under the relevant legislation and a clear process needs to be undertaken and documented. Increased suicidal risk has been identified in clients experiencing significant relationship issues as this often impacts upon their emotional health.

Assessments for safety and risk in clients also include the need to assess for suicide risk or engagement in past or present self-harming behaviours. In this workshop, a number of risk assessment frameworks will be considered to assist practitioners to make an informed decision about the level of risk and its impact on the service that the client is seeking.

Risk assessment frameworks will cover the assessment of suicide risk in:

  • preparation for and participation in mediation for family dispute resolution;
  • face-to-face counselling;
  • lawyer negotiations;
  • case management of families;
  • conducting groups.

Learning outcomes

Participants will gain increased skills in:

  • identifying suicide risk, present or past;
  • using appropriate risk assessment frameworks;
  • asking questions in a sensitive manner;
  • understanding our own emotional reactions to such matters;
  • when and how to appropriately refer clients for ongoing assistance;
  • a summary risk assessment framework.

Ideal for:

Counsellors, psychologists, social workers, family dispute resolution practitioners, mediators, lawyers, intake workers, group facilitators, education and health professionals

This workshop introduces non-legal practitioners, such as psychologists, counsellors and social workers, to the requirements and legal obligations of writing court reports, attending court as a witness or support person, and your responsibilities to your clients. We will examine commonly-requested reports such as Parenting Reports, Child Assessments, Family Reports, and Intervention Order assessment reports. Consideration will be given to the laws which govern these reports, including the Family Law Act and the Children and Young Person’s Act.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • develop knowledge of how the Family Court, Melbourne Magistrates’ Court and Federal Circuit Court of Australia operate
  • understand the requirements of attending court as a witness who is subpoenaed
  • understand the requirements of attending court as a support person
  • understand the purpose, structure and use of a court report
  • analyse how reports are used in courts, and the issues that may arise in the process of cross-examination
  • analyse the impact of having an on-going professional relationship with clients after the process of court preparation.

Ideal for:

Professionals who have been asked to attend court or write a report for a client. This includes psychologists, counsellors, social workers, family workers, allied health and medical staff.

At some stage over their careers, many people will find themselves needing to support or help a colleague or a friend who is in difficult circumstances. Counselling skills can often assist in the management of the colleague or friend’s emotional response to an issue or event. Other situations where a person may need to be the “casual counsellor” include helping a staff member who is a direct report, helping a student or parent in an education setting or assisting a client in a non-clinical situation.

This workshop will focus on how to respond to a range of emotions, language and behaviours that often accompany difficult issues. It will also cover how to recognise when you might intervene as a casual counsellor and when you should refer to other professional helpers. Finally, the workshop will also discuss how you can keep from being too involved with the situation and strategies to take care of yourself.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • identify when a colleague/staff member/client is not coping emotionally
  • apply knowledge of how to decide when to intervene or assist
  • demonstrate basic counselling skills including listening, using empathy, questioning and reframing
  • apply strategies for their own reactions and the need for self-care.

Ideal for:

Staff in a range of workplaces including the community, education, health and business sectors who may need to support colleagues or clients.

Explore child-focused, trauma-informed practice skills for working with families impacted by family violence.

Family violence affects a significant number of Australian adults and children each year. One in six women and one in 16 men have been subjected to physical and/or sexual violence by a current or previous cohabiting partner (1). Furthermore, more than two-thirds (68%) of mothers who had experienced violence when they had children in their care said their children had seen or heard the violence (1).

Family violence can have profound short- and long-term physical, emotional and mental health effects on children, even when they have not been directly exposed to the violence. Family violence is also associated with an increased risk of children being victims themselves. Therefore, focusing on the safety of children is crucial when working with families experiencing family violence.

This workshop draws on recent research and case studies to explore child-focused, trauma-informed practice skills for practitioners working with families and children affected by family violence.

Topics

  • Intimate partner violence and its impacts on children and family functioning
  • Correlations between intimate partner violence and child abuse
  • Child-focused and trauma-informed practice
  • Understanding and fostering resilience factors
  • Ongoing risk assessment and risk management
  • Collaborative practice and the service system
  • Self-care and managing vicarious trauma.

Ideal for:

Counsellors, psychologists, social workers and case managers working with individuals, couples, children and families affected by family violence.

 

(1) Personal Safety Survey 2016. ABS cat. no. 4906.0. Canberra: ABS.

Enhance your knowledge and skills to effectively conduct therapeutic groups

This “hands-on” workshop will provide you with skills to enhance your ability to conduct therapeutic groups. Your experience as a workshop participant will be a valuable tool with experiential exercises and role plays as an important part of your learning. We hold the view that having an experience of being a group member is the best learning to become an effective group facilitator.

Learning Outcomes

The workshop will assist you to:

  • recognise that groups provide us with important information about our client’s interpersonal style
  • assist participants in providing feedback to group members in their role as facilitator
  • understand the value of using “here and now” experiences within a group
  • assist participants in handling difficulties which arise within a group context
  • provide participants with strategies if they wish to adopt a more experiential approach to their group work.

Ideal for:

Professionals interested in developing their process skills in group facilitation.

Discuss practical strategies for managing conflict in different situations

Conflict occurs when there is both a perceived difference between the interests of the parties concerned and a belief, at least initially, that both sets of interest cannot be met simultaneously. In the workplace, this can happen quite regularly as many people work in teams and need to complete tasks together. Conflict can result in both negative and positive outcomes, depending on how it is managed.

This workshop will discuss a number of practical strategies for managing conflict in different situations and provide participants with skills to implement these strategies. It will cover a clear process that participants can use to achieve positive outcomes and discuss when other conflict resolution processes may need to be engaged.

Outcomes

  • An understanding of conflict, including the common antecedents of disputes
  • An understanding your responses to conflict
  • Conflict management strategies and how they are applicable to different situations
  • Skills to implement a collaborative and problem solving approach to conflict management
  • A conflict resolution process to achieve more positive outcomes
  • Self-care strategies and managing emotions.

Ideal for:

Staff in a variety of workplaces including the community, education, health and business sectors who deal with conflict from clients, customers, colleagues and management.

Gain the skills to launch and facilitate a therapeutic support group - a task which can be challenging for even the most experienced clinicians.

Learning outcomes

  • Learn how to set up an effective therapeutic support group
  • Learn how to create a clear aim and focus
  • Understand how to design and facilitate appropriate group activities
  • Learn about ethical conduct and legal implications
  • Understand the importance of setting boundaries
  • Learn how to seek additional support

Ideal for:

This workshop is designed for clinicians, social workers, community organisation workers, health professionals, youth workers, child and family workers and counsellors at any level of experience.

Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) is a complex process that requires a practitioner to manage challenging dynamics – subtle, bold and unexpected – to provide a safe and appropriate service, make ethical decisions, be an excellent listener, knowledgeable, tech-savvy, child-focused, well balanced, quick thinking, observant, responsive, flexible, reflective and all the while take good care of self as well.

Learning outcomes

  • A fresh look at effective communication skills in FDR
  • Managing the dynamics of shuttle FDR and those of private sessions
  • Effective whiteboard skills (real and online)
  • Managing subtle power imbalances and resisting invitations to collude
  • Balancing impartiality and empowerment in challenging dynamics
  • Mastering reflective practice and self-care

Ideal for:

This workshop is designed for FDR Practitioners at any level of experience, who would like to hone their existing skills and add new strategies to their toolkit.

Refresh and enhance your family dispute resolution (FDR) practice skills.

If you are an accredited FDR Practitioner and you want to ensure that your practice is up to date, these short intensive sessions will help to refresh and enhance your knowledge and skills in FDR practice through information sessions, discussion and interactive activities.

 

Topics include:

  • Models of practice
  • Intake and assessment processes and FDR obligations
  • Managing complex presentations
  • Family violence – assessing for and awareness of its impacts in FDR
  • Family Law Act - children’s matters
  • Certificates and maintaining currency for registration

Learning outcomes

Participants will:

  • focus on currency of FDR skills, knowledge and techniques that will assist in facilitating options for the resolution of disputes
  • understand recent changes to FDR practice
  • be able to assess for suitability of FDR, family violence and mental health 
  • build the capacity of participants' FDR practice.

Ideal for:

Accredited FDR practitioners.

Format

The program consists of three sessions that will cover a range of topics related to conducting FDR in practice. You can pick the topics that are relevant to you, and can attend either one, two or three sessions.

Develop advanced skills for supervising and supporting family dispute resolution practitioners.

Are you supporting Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner (FDR) colleagues? Do you listen to their Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) practice concerns and client dilemmas? 

Are you invested in providing professional support to FDR practitioners? If you’re interested in developing advanced skills in FDR Supervision, learning how to facilitate the FDRPs’ practice, assisting practitioners to consider their practice within an educative framework, developing evolving reflective practice for FDRPs and ensuring better outcomes for clients this workshop is for you.

Overview

Day 1 - Concept of supervision and relevance to FDR practice

  • What is supervision?
  • How does FDR supervision differ from established supervision practices?
  • What are the purposes of supervision?
  • Supervision models and their advantages/disadvantages, different modalities/practices.
  • What do practitioners need from, and value most in supervision?

Day 2 - How to understand your role as a FDR supervisor

  • Confidentiality, contracting and disclosure.
  • Managing relationship dynamics in supervision.
  • The relationship of the supervisor to management.
  • Ethical dilemmas.
  • Who supervises the supervisor?

Day 3 - How to/Practical

  • Guidelines for being an effective FDR supervisor.
  • What not to do and what to do.
  • How to manage FDR supervision becoming counselling?
  • Understanding the difference between Coaching, counselling, therapy and FDR.
  • Time management of supervision.
  • Frequency of help.
  • How to ensure supervision is helpful?

Includes:

Active participation, presentation, experiential component, group discussions.

Gain practical skills and knowledge to enhance your work with family violence-impacted individuals and families.

Family violence is a significant and pervasive issue in our communities and in recent years there has been a growing demand for family violence prevention and response services. In Australia, one in six women and one in 16 men experience physical or sexual violence from a current or former partner, and on average, one woman is killed each week and one man is killed each month in a family violence situation.

 

Services that prevent and respond to family violence require workers who are skilled in recognising and assessing risks, and identifying the most appropriate interventions and approaches for their clients. Recognising the needs of the family violence workforce, this course equips workers with knowledge and practical skills for responding to victims/survivors of family violence, including children, as well as an understanding of perpetrator characteristics, attitudes and behaviours. The training provides information on current industry trends, standards and expectations along with opportunities to learn and practice new skills in a safe and supportive environment.

Learning outcomes

Participants will gain:

  • an understanding of the prevalence of family violence, including current issues and trends
  • knowledge of the impacts of family violence on victims/survivors, including children
  • awareness of the characteristics, attitudes and behaviours of perpetrators
  • skills for working with victims/survivors, while keeping the needs of children as a central focus
  • a framework of practical steps to assess, manage and report risk
  • strategies for monitoring and maintaining self-care to enable sustainable practice.

Ideal for:

Professionals wishing to enhance their skills to work with clients impacted by family violence.

Learn about different types of family violence and how family violence can impact workplaces.

Everyone has the right to feel safe and free from abuse and violence in their relationships. Family violence is not only about physical assault but refers to an array of power and control which may include direct or indirect threats, sexual assault, emotional and psychological torment, economic control, property damage, social isolation and behaviour which causes a person to live in fear.

As well as the impact of family violence an individual’s personal life, family violence can also affect workplaces in a variety of ways. These include the need for time off from work to locate and access support services, the potential for parties involved in conflict to present at the other person’s workplace and demanding to see them. Workplaces can also be used as public drop-off points for children.

As well as affecting individuals and families, family violence can also impact workplaces, as it is likely that some staff will have experienced this issue directly or indirectly.

This training is designed to raise awareness about family violence, including what family violence is, the extent of family violence in Australia and how family violence can impact the workplace.

The session also includes information about how to respond initially to a disclosure from a person experiencing family violence.

Participants will learn about:

  • family violence in Australia
  • types of family violence
  • the impacts of family violence in the workplace
  • common myths about family violence
  • responding initially to a family violence disclosure
  • how to make a referral to a family violence service
  • self-care.

Learn strategies to diffuse difficult situations, manage intense emotions, and move towards positive solutions.

Everyone gets frustrated or angry on occasion, particularly when they are under pressure. Most people deal with their anger and frustrations in ways that are socially acceptable and appropriate. Other people however, may deal with their anger and other strong emotions in unhelpful ways that do not lead to a resolution. They may even make the situation worse.

In this workshop, we will discuss and practice strategies that you can use to diffuse situations where clients, colleagues or community members may be exhibiting strong emotions and/or difficult behaviours. When using these strategies, it is important to have an understanding of your own particular triggers and how you can manage your own emotions.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • explain how and why people react to difficult situations physically and emotionally
  • apply strategies for helping others to manage emotions 
  • develop and apply effective communication skills
  • articulate and apply conflict management strategies
  • demonstrate an understanding of how to monitor and maintain self-care.

Ideal for:

A range of workers in community organisations, social services, schools or businesses dealing with challenging clients or colleagues.

Difficult conversations can be uncomfortable. In this workshop you will learn how to apply skills to prepare for difficult conversations, and strategies to help you to manage your emotions and support others in the conversation. This workshop will also explore and unpack effective communication skills and common conflict management styles.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • apply skills to prepare for a difficult conversation
  • demonstrate an understanding of effective communication skills
  • demonstrate an understanding of how and why people react to difficult situations physically and emotionally
  • apply strategies to manage emotions
  • demonstrate an understanding of common conflict management styles.

Ideal for:

Staff in a range of workplaces including the community, education, health and business sectors who may need to support colleagues or clients.

Many people will experience mental health issues at some stage in their lives, including in the workplace. These people may need additional support at work during this time.

Participants will gain a greater understanding of how individuals are affected by common mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, stress, mood disorders and suicide ideation. The workshop will also detail and discuss how workplaces can respond appropriately and assist people with these issues.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • understand common mental health issues and how they affect people
  • identify indicators of mental ill-health
  • apply skills to support colleagues who are experiencing mental health issues
  • appropriately refer colleagues or staff to access support services and assistance.

Ideal for:

Anyone who may need to support a colleague or staff member experiencing mental health challenges

Everyday life can present us with many different types of stress.

In this workshop you will analyse different types and sources of stress and understand reactions to stress including physiological, psychological and behavioural.

This workshop will provide you with strategies that you can use to build resilience and manage your stress both at work and at home. Importantly, we will also evaluate the relationship between performance and pressure.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • understand the types and sources of stress
  • understand reactions to stress – physiological, psychological and behavioural
  • recognise when you may be experiencing ‘negative’ stress
  • apply strategies that you can use to manage your stress both at work and at home
  • evaluate the relationship between performance and pressure
  • develop strategies for ongoing self-care.

Ideal for:

A range of workers in community organisations, social services, schools or businesses managing stressful situations with clients or colleagues.

People can often manage negotiation and conflict from different perspectives. 

This online workshop will help enhance your negotiation and conflict management skills. This will be done through an analysis of common conflict management styles and processes, understanding assertiveness and learning how to develop and then implement strategies to manage emotions. 

The facilitator will work collaboratively with participants to seek and apply alternative solutions to conflict with methods that can be transferred to everyday life.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of common conflict management styles
  • demonstrate an understanding of about conflict management processes
  • demonstrate an understanding of assertiveness
  • develop strategies to manage emotions
  • seek and apply alternative solutions.

Ideal for:

Staff in a range of workplaces including the community, education, health and business sectors who may need to support colleagues or clients.

Maintaining professional and personal boundaries can be challenging for social, community and health professionals who want to do everything possible to help clients. This workshop will explore the professional and personal boundaries of helping roles, why professionals need them and why it’s important for them to regularly reflect on their practice.

Professional boundaries are the legal, ethical and organisational frameworks that protect both clients and workers from physical and emotional harm, and help to maintain a safe working environment. Maintaining these boundaries is sometimes difficult. For example, if a client offers gifts, wants to extend the relationship beyond the service provided or divulges information not relevant to the therapeutic goals. Situations such as these require workers to clearly understand their role, and how to manage the organisational and personal risks.

Personal boundaries are the physical, emotional and mental limits people use to protect themselves from being drawn too much into clients’ lives and from being manipulated or violated by others. They allow professionals to maintain psychological safety for themselves and their clients and make objective decisions about the therapeutic process to most effectively assist clients in achieving their goals. This workshop will discuss strategies to maintain these boundaries, and the importance of self-care.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • set clear expectations with clients about the therapeutic process and their role
  • understand the boundaries of professional roles and when to refer to other services
  • manage ethical dilemmas and client expectations
  • maintain physical and psychological safety
  • develop reflective practices
  • develop self-care strategies.

Ideal for:

Therapeutic workers such as counsellors, psychologists, social workers, youth workers, health and mental health workers, and social program facilitators.

Enhance your knowledge and skills to work with families around property and financial matters.

This two-day course is ideal for accredited Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) Practitioners with experience working with families around parenting arrangements.

This course will help to strengthen and develop your existing knowledge and skills with property and financial matters within FDR. It will also provide the opportunity to enhance your confidence through the practical application of skills in activities and role plays.

Key topics:

  • legal principles
  • assessment of suitability
  • preparation for property FDR
  • structured FDR process
  • property agreements
  • working with other professionals.

Outcomes

Participants will enhance their:

  • understanding of how to work as an FDRP with property and financial matters within the family law context
  • knowledge of the complexities of property and financial matters for FDR practice
  • skills for working with property and financial matters in FDR.

Ideal for:

Accredited Family Dispute Resolution Practitioners.

Learn how to listen and respond appropriately to staff and colleagues experiencing family violence.

Everyone has the right to feel safe and free from abuse and violence in their relationships. Family violence is not only about physical assault but refers to an array of power and control which may include direct or indirect threats, sexual assault, emotional and psychological torment, economic control, property damage, social isolation and behaviour which causes a person to live in fear.

As well as affecting individuals and families, family violence can also impact workplaces in a variety of ways. It is likely that some staff will have experienced this issue directly or indirectly and employees may need time off work to locate and access support services. Additionally, there is the potential for parties involved in conflict to present at the other person’s workplace demanding to see them. Workplaces can also be used as public drop-off points for children.

This interactive training is designed specifically for workplaces, to assist managers and staff to feel confident in raising and responding to family violence concerns with their staff.

Participants will gain knowledge about family violence and have an opportunity to explore and practice skills in the difficult task of responding to these situations, from both a personal and an organisational perspective.

Learning outcomes

Participants will learn about:

  • family violence in Australia
  • types of family violence
  • the impact of family violence in the workplace
  • common myths about family violence
  • the indicators of family violence
  • how to ask initial questions about family violence
  • how to respond appropriately to family violence disclosure
  • how to make a referral to family violence services
  • relevant legislation
  • self-care.

Ideal for:

Staff in a range of business units within organisations that may need to respond to, and assist people experiencing, family violence at home

In this full-day workshop, the presenter will emphasise that even though single session contacts are just one hour, they should aim to be a ‘whole’ therapy.

It is necessary to focus on achieving a beginning, middle and end to the way the session is organised. It is essential to narrow the data and approach the therapy with some pragmatism. 

Participants of this workshop will engage with valuable strategies and tools that can be integrated into their practice.

Learning outcomes

  • Make the most effective use of just one hour 
  • Narrow the data
  • Understand that in walk-in therapy the goal is for the client to leave the session with a sense of emotional relief and some sort of positive outcome
  • Learn, as early as possible, what the client wants from the session
  • Understand client motivation
  • Learn about risk and safety

Ideal for:

This workshop is designed for clinicians, social workers, community organisation workers, health professionals, youth workers, child and family workers and counsellors at any level of experience.

This workshop is designed for workers in community and health organisations and schools who regularly work with children, adolescents and/or their parents. When parents separate, it can be a difficult time for them and their children. It is normal for separating families to experience a range of strong emotions and families often need to adjust to new living arrangements.

In this workshop, you will learn about the separation process, how it impacts on parents and children and how you can assist parents, children and adolescents to manage this change within your work setting.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the separation process and the impact on families and children
  • demonstrate knowledge of the family law system and family dispute resolution.
  • develop an ability to identify behaviours in children resulting from separation and strategies to manage these behaviours.
  • develop in supporting parents to better manage their separation and support their children
  • develop the ability to identify when families need more support.

Ideal for:

Community organisation workers, school staff, health professionals, youth workers, child and family workers, and counsellors.

In this workshop you will develop a comprehensive understanding of the essential theories of grief and become equipped with strategies to help you analyse the grief experiences of others close to you. You will also work collaboratively with the presenter and other participants in order to learn how best to evaluate the impact of losses.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • develop a comprehensive understanding of essential theories of grief
  • analyse the grief experiences of family members and partners
  • evaluate the impact of losses associated with the separation of families and couples
  • apply evidence-based techniques to support clients experiencing grief.

Ideal for:

Staff in a range of workplaces including the community, education, health and business sectors who may need to support colleagues or clients.

Learn a narrative therapy approach for working with vulnerable people.

The Tree of Life is an approach that enables people to speak about their lives in ways that make them stronger.

This narrative therapy approach enables people to talk about their lives in ways that do not re-traumatise them, but instead, strengthen their connection with their history, culture, and the significant people in their lives.

This involves encouraging people to draw their own Tree of Life, where they get to talk about their roots (where they come from), their skills and knowledge, their hopes and dreams, and the special people in their lives. Participants then join their trees into a ‘forest of life’.  

Learning outcomes

You'll gain an understanding of the Tree of Life methodology and how to:

  • encourage vulnerable clients to draw their own Tree of Life
  • discuss some of the challenges that affect people’s lives and ways to respond to these 
  • help clients strengthen their relationships with their history, culture and significant people in their lives.

Ideal for:

Counsellors, clinicians, social workers, community workers and health practitioners who work with vulnerable clients.

Psychological trauma can occur when a person is not able to cope with a distressing or overwhelming event, or process the emotions involved with their experiences.

Professionals including clinicians, frontline staff, supervisors and managers can experience vicarious trauma as a result of hearing about another person’s trauma and witnessing their associated distress. Over time, this work-related exposure to clients’ trauma can have a significant impact on professionals’ wellbeing.

This workshop will explore different types of trauma and how they can impact staff and organisations. Factors that enhance and undermine resilience will be discussed. We will also outline strategies that you can use to manage vicarious trauma and maintain your wellbeing at work.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • understand the nature and impact of vicarious trauma
  • identify tools for monitoring your own and others’ personal and professional wellbeing
  • identify strategies to reduce your risk, and the risk of others, of experiencing vicarious trauma
  • recognise the signs and symptoms that may indicate vicarious trauma is affecting wellbeing and work
  • incorporate practices that support resilience and sustainability into work routines.

Ideal for:

Frontline staff, clinical staff, leaders, supervisors and managers.

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Contact us

To discuss your training needs or express your interest, complete our enquiry form below or call (03) 8753 2222. One of our education consultants will contact you to organise a time to discuss your learning needs. We will then provide a tailored training proposal, addressing your individual needs.

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